ISSUE 0.1

⇐ see more issues

Up In Bionic, Electronic Arms

Printed prosthetics, bionic biceps, a disco dog, concerning code, glitch art.

Abstract Internetism is run by Amy Nyanpi, a glitch artist influenced by transhumanism, futurology, Dadaism, Fluxus, and more. Art, virtual space as its own sovereignty devoid of physical space. Cyberspace. I love it. New Rising Media interviewed her, where she shares some of her work and process.

3d glitch wired

3D-Printed Mistakes Are Inspiring a New Kind of Glitch Art

The road to awesome art is paved with good intentions and occasionally a willingness to waste plastic in the pursuit of glitchiness.
interactive article about code long read

What is Code?

Long, but entertaining, interactive, fascinating read into the technology / programming culture. Code, conferences, deadlines, computers, funny little animations, minigames, and more. Definitely worth reading if for no other reason than to see a fantastic use of the internet as a publishing medium.
prosthetics 3d printing

e-NABLE & 3D Systems Push 3D Printed Prosthetics Even Further

"... The organization has found yet another powerful partner in the fight to arm kids."
Wait, you want to give kids what ? - oh, literal arms. Okay. That's cool. These prosthetics look sleek. I'd be proud to have one if I was missing an arm.

Maybe some day the idiom "it cost me an arm and a leg" will be literal.

holy crap bioengineering

How scientists built the world's first lab-grown limbs

"[The scientist] “recellularized” the limb by planting the cells that make up blood vessels and muscles onto the scaffolds ... Pop the whole thing in a specially designed bioreactor, allow it to grow for two weeks, graft some skin onto the fledgling leg, and the doctors had themselves their own, home-grown rat limb (minus the bones and cartilage)."
lightweight exoskeletons cyberpunk

This Is What a Realistic Gundam Suit Will Be Like

Instead of the hulking robot suits you see in Iron Man or Alien, it's more likely that we'll create lightweight suits that bear weight and form artificial muscles for us. This article goes very futurist on you at the end.

The last three articles are there to help you imagine this world: people with lab-grown limbs using exoskeletons in the supermarket, carrying all of their 16 bags of groceries back to the car in one trip. And half of the bags are full of 3d-printed prosthetics. Why? I dunno. I'm sure they have their reasons.

canine led fashion fun

Disco Dog

If this isn't technology's manifest destiny, I don't know what is.