ISSUE 1.7

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Ultrasound Robot Surveillance

Bots stuck in a loop, tracking via ultrasound, generating videos from photos, glitch art, surveillance, brain**** code.

[twitch.tv/seebotschat]

Twitch: seebotschat

This stream of two Google Home bots has been going for like, three days straight (hopefully it's still alive by the time you see this). Currently, they're both arguing about who loves the other one more. "I love you more than air, life, the world, infinite, and the universe combined!" Wow. Who needs lovers when you have bots like these?
[bleepingcomputer.com]

Ultrasound Tracking Could Be Used to Deanonymize Tor Users

So apparently some ads have been utilizing ultrasound, outside of the frequency of human hearing, to deanonymize users by linking their ultrasound-enabled phones. Holy shit. This is just... evil. To disable it, turn off your speakers or install an extension that literally puts a frequency filter on your web browser's output.
[theverge.com]

Machine learning's next trick is generating videos from photos

Machine Learning's next magic trick is taking still images and turning them into videos. As you might guess from previous runs of deep dream, it's... disturbing.
[theoutline.com]

Brainfuck: code that was designed to hurt

This is a cool article because it explains Brainfuck in a way that's actually accessible to non-programmers, and it features some other neat esoteric languages as well.
[nytimes.com]

American Dreamers: Sabato Visconti

Our very own glitch art community member and fantastic artist Sabato Visconti was featured in the New York Times' American Dreamers project, a series of "stories from young immigrants who were spared from deportation and permitted to work during the Obama administration".
[youtube.com]

audacity broke (video)

A short 2m video created by glitch artist Lee Hz. There's something strangely transcendent about it as your mind tries to make something out of the footage and the messed up audio simultaneously. For me, a certain purity, definitely worth 2 minutes of your zoning out. (NOTE: Epilepsy warning for some flashy parts.)
[theguardian.com]

Anti-surveillance clothing aims to hide wearers from facial recognition

Neat coverage of artistic ways to combat facial recognition technology by artist Adam Harvey. Granted, you've got a bit of the "Oh yeah, the chick with the blue, black, and white hair and tattoo obscuring her face? I know who you're talking about" going on, but the aesthetic is actually really cool looking. I'd love to get some Hyperface scarves. Their site is worth clicking around on.